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Program

May 28, 2019 6:00 PM

Concert / Screening / Discussion: INFLUENCES & INITIATIVES / New York – Ostrava

The Orchestra of The S.E.M. Ensemble performs music by Brown, Lucier, Heflin, Wolff, Vítková and Kotík, plus a screening and discussion with guests about Ostrava Days and its influence on American music.

Concert / Screening / Discussion:

INFLUENCES & INITIATIVES / New York – Ostrava
The Orchestra of The S.E.M. Ensemble

MAY 28, 6PM screening in the Cinema & 8PM concert in the Ballroom

Earle Brown, Petr Kotik, Christian Wolff and Alvin Lucier plan Ostrava Days, 2001.


SCREENING & DISCUSSION 
6PM in the Cinema

RSVP for screening & discussion (limited seating)

Please join us at 6pm for a screening of video documentation from Ostrava Days. Following the screening will be a discussion about the festival's impact in Europe and America with past participants of Ostrava Days.

May 2019 will mark 20 years since Ostrava Days was conceived. The first biennial Ostrava Days institute and festival took place in 2001. Since then, 69 young and emerging American composers have come to Ostrava – to name a few: Alex Mincek, Noni Epstein, Sam Hilmer, Kate Soper, James Ilgenfritz, Matthew Welch and Carolyn Chen. At Ostrava, these emerging composers worked and collaborated with such established composers as George Lewis, Bernhard Lang, Kaija Saeriaho, Rebeca Saunders, Roscoe Mitchell, Miroslav Srnka, Louis Andriessen, Philip Glass, Martin Smolka, Jennifer Walshe, Marc Sabat, Muhal Richard Abrams, Carola Bauckholt, etc. (besides the almost yearly participation of Wolff, Lucier and Kotik).

CONCERT
8PM in the Ballroom

RSVP

S.E.M. Ensemble
Petr Kotik, Director

Program:
Christian Wolff / Trust
Alvin Lucier / Navigations for Strings
Lucie Vítková* / Nine
Petr Kotik / Nine+1
Anna Heflin* / Included/Excluded
Earle Brown / Available Forms I

*Student-Residents of Ostrava days

Christian Wolff prepares for rehearsal of "Ordinary Matter" for three orchestras.


The idea of Ostrava Days originated in 1999, when I was asked to organize a concert with three orchestras “Music in Space” for the Prague Spring Festival. The program included “Gruppen” by Karlheinz Stockhausen, “Diamonds” by Alvin Lucier (world premiere), “Modules I, II, III” by Earle Brown (first complete performance) and “Sacrae Symphoniae” by Giovanni Gabrielli (1597), all of them for three large ensembles. It was performed by the Janáček Philharmonic Ostrava with additional musicians from New York (SEM) and Europe, and was conducted by Zsolt Nagy, Christian Arming, and myself.

When I arrived in Ostrava three weeks before the concert to rehearse (this was my third visit), I realized the extraordinary potential the city had for making music: the philharmonic’s three rehearsal spaces, a newly built conservatory, and a multitude of performance venues, including enormous industrial spaces. I began to discuss the idea of Ostrava Days with anyone willing to listen, and was met with overwhelming support (and occasional disbelief).


A three orchestra concert at Ostrava Days 2015.


In New York, I asked Earle Brown, Christian Wolff and Alvin Lucier to participate and help set up the first Ostrava Days. All of us agreed on the basic concept: three weeks of lectures, presentations, workshops, discussions, and a series of concerts organized as a festival. After receiving its first major grant from the Trust for Mutual Understanding, as well as local institutional and private support, Ostrava Days became a reality, and the four of us met at Earle Brown’s studio-loft to plan the project.

Conceptually, Ostrava Days was very much influenced by ideas that came from New York, in combination with European possibilities. The interaction between American and European influences at Ostrava Days are clearly evident, but what is equally significant is the impact Ostrava has had on music in America. A number of major large-scale orchestra compositions would be unthinkable without Ostrava, and it is these large-scale compositions that often define a composer’s contribution to music. There have been large-scale compositions by, among others, Phill Niblock, Pauline Oliveros, Alvin Lucier, Christian Wolff and myself, as well as works by emerging composers such as Jack Callahan, Ben Richter, James Falzone, Eli Greenhoe, David Kant, and Ravi Kittapa, all of which would not exist without Ostrava.

A performance of Phill Niblock's "Three Petals" for three orchestras, 2016.


May 2019 will mark 20 years since Ostrava Days was conceived. The first biennial Ostrava Days institute and festival took place in 2001. Since then, 69 young and emerging American composers have come to Ostrava – to name a few: Alex Mincek, Noni Epstein, Sam Hilmer, Kate Soper, James Ilgenfritz, Matthew Welch and Carolyn Chen. At Ostrava, these emerging composers worked and collaborated with George Lewis, Bernhard Lang, Kaija Saariaho, Rebeca Saunders, Roscoe Mitchell, Miroslav Srnka, Louis Andriessen, Philip Glass, Martin Smolka, Jennifer Walshe, Marc Sabat, Muhal Richard Abrams, Carola Bauckholt, etc. (besides the almost yearly participation of Wolff, Lucier and myself).

Many participants from past and upcoming Ostrava Days will be present at Bohemian National Hall on May 28th, including student-residents and musicians. Among those present will be Alvin Lucier and the music critic Kurt Gottschalk, who covered the festival from 2011-2015.

- Petr Kotik, April 2019


Pauline Oliveros after a performance of "Four Meditations for Orchestra".

Venue:

Bohemian National Hall, 321 East 73rd Street
NY 10021 New York
United States

Date

May 28, 2019 6:00 PM

Organizer:

Czech Centre


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